Statistics

The pathologies treated at the SARAH Network are accompanied by epidemiological studies that enable a broader understanding of the patient's profiles and, in some instances, the causes that led to their condition.

Reports, generated based on information about the main external causes of hospitalization, show their etiologies and the circumstances in which they occurred.  The external causes are a set of foreseeable and preventable events that resulted in the patient’s hospitalization or even death.

With these studies, SARAH is able to plan and maintain the quality of the services provided, as well as subsidize, with its statistical data, its Accident Prevention and Education Programs.

A study conducted during the first semester of 2014, in which hospitalized patients were interviewed, revealed that 22.3% of admissions at the SARAH Network were due to external causes.

External causes, also known as unnatural or violent causes, include accidents and actual violence (self-inflicted or inflicted by others).

Traffic accidents were the main external reason for hospitalization, accounting for 49.4% of the cases.  Violence (including firearms, knives and physical assault) were the second cause, with 23.3% of the cases.  Also on the list of external causes in the study are falls (14.6%), diving accidents (4.2%), impact from heavy objects (2.2%), among others (6.3%).